News

July 17, 2017

Expert Testimony Is Not Necessarily Required In Order to Recover Under the Jones Act

The case of Salem v. United States Lines Co., 370 U.S. 31 (1962) is a 1960’s era Supreme Court case that determined that it was not always necessary for a plaintiff to use an expert witness to prove that […]
Read more
July 17, 2017

Illnesses Are Compensable Injuries Under the Jones Act

Prior to the Supreme Court’s decision in Sentilles v. Inter-Caribbean Shipping Corp., 361 U.S. 107 (1959), the question of whether an illness could be compensated for under the Jones Act was left unanswered. In this case, a seaman had […]
Read more
July 17, 2017

Understanding the McCorpen Defense to Jones Act Claims

When a Jones Act attorney evaluates a maritime injury case, one of the issues that is commonly analyzed by the Jones Act attorney is whether the seaman’s maritime employer can use the “McCorpen defense” to avoid paying maintenance and […]
Read more
July 17, 2017

An “Unseaworthy Vessel” Is a Theory of Recovery Under the Jones Act

A maritime attorney who is preparing to file a claim under the Jones Act on behalf of an injured seaman must state a theory of recovery that is recognized under the law. Under the Jones Act, there are several […]
Read more
July 17, 2017

Understanding Res Judicata In Maritime Cases

An offshore attorney who regularly handles maritime injury cases understands that there are multiple compensation programs that are available to injured sea workers under the law. The sources of recovery include the Jones Act, the Longshore and Harbor Workers’ […]
Read more
July 17, 2017

The Standard of Proof For Causation In Jones Act Cases

When a Louisiana Jones Act lawyer represents an injured seaman in a Jones Act case, the lawyer is required to demonstrate causation in order to recover compensation benefits for his client. The term causation is legal jargon for the […]
Read more